LearningSCAPES Tour #2  –  10:00 am – 2:45pm*

*approximate ending time

TOUR IS FULL

WAIT LIST IS ALSO FULL

***Please note: for security measures photos of students are not allowed during the tour. ***

Tour A length: 45 minutes

Jane L. Westerhold Early Learning Center

1375 S 5th Avenue, Des Plaines Il 60018

Tour Leader:

Description:
Following passage of an education rate referendum and prudent fiscal management over an eight year span, Des Plaines CCSD 62 built its fund balances to make substantial building improvements throughout the District. Following an extensive two-year building assessment, master planning, and community engagement process the Board of Education approved the issuance of non-referendum bonds totaling $109 million for a three-phase capital improvement program. In addition to supporting educational program enhancements, the capital improvement funding was assigned to update, enhance, and expand educational environments throughout the District. In combination with major additions/renovation projects at three of its most aged and overcrowded facilities, the District elected to maximize its resources and consolidate under one roof, alongside the most centrally located elementary school, all of its early childhood education programs that had been scattered throughout the District.

The primary instructional spaces in the schools are positioned around two, secured courtyards. In both cases, a combination of fixed/operable windows and stackable glass doors allow an abundance of natural light to permeate from these outdoor instructional venues into the core of the building. The first courtyard is formed by constructing the ELC addition along the east side of the elementary school. It is intended to accommodate shared-use, garden plots. The second courtyard is the organizing feature of the ELC.

Tour B length: 45 minutes

Kennedy Elementary School

3945 North Wehrman Avenue, Schiller Park

Tour Leader:
Matthew Ryan Lowe, LEED ® AP BD + C DLA Architects, Ltd.

Description:
Learn how success was achieved by close cooperation between stakeholders and designers in this multi-year, multi-phase improvement project.

When kids leave their grand opening tour asking if they can come back the next day, you know that a school design resonates. From top to bottom, the addition at Kennedy Elementary is student-focused and designed to support all types of learning. Participants will see how existing schools can be transformed into learning environments that align with today’s educational goals. You will tour flexible classrooms and small group spaces that encourage communication and peer-to-peer learning. You’ll see the innovative learning corridor that opens the LRC to the school community. The classrooms encourage active learning with easy-to-rearrange, flexible furniture. Students collaborate in small (breakout rooms), research in an introspective space (window seat), or engage as a large group. Color defines the cohorts and special areas within the school (e.g., third-grade spaces are teal; pre-K blue; reading rooms green). Transparent walls enhance security and inspire wonder by putting learning on display. They function as writing surfaces in spaces such as the breakout rooms and excite students with their novelty. Students and staff connect to the world of living things through natural light, views, and the selection of materials (e.g., “grass” Flotex flooring and wood-look ceilings). This is especially evident in the presentation space, where an amphitheater becomes a “hill.” The “learning corridor” is a mash-up of circulation and media center that welcomes students to linger with a book or technology.

Tour C length: 45 minutes

CCSD 59 Early Learning Center

1900 Lonnquist Blvd.,Mount Prospect, IL 60056

Tour Leader:
Tom Luedloff

Description:
The CCSD59 Early Learning Center was designed to inspire curiosity, encourage interaction, and optimize indoor/outdoor connections. The facility, driven by community workshops, offers a setting customized to early learners: colorful curving patterns, tactile materials, and places to gather and explore. The entry even has a child-sizeblue door that welcomes students.Tour highlights include a large, nature-based motor courtyard and three themed learning gardens that create secure play areas and maximize natural light and views. Other features include integrated therapy rooms between classrooms, light-filled corridors with a culinary arts space and break.out areas, an indoor motor skills area, and a family support center. This facility was constructed as an addition to the existing Holmes Junior High School. It was constructed to consolidate the district’s early learner population in one centralized location. This consolidation freed up space at other district schools to allow for the implementation of full-day kindergarten district-wide. The 58,000-square-foot addition provides a secure connection point to the Junior High School to allow program access between facilities. It also houses dual-use training space for district staff and parents.

LU 2.25

 

Kennedy Elementary School

Abstract:   When kids leave their grand opening tour asking if they can come back the next day, you know that a school design resonates. From top to bottom, the addition at Kennedy Elementary is student-focused and designed to support all types of learning. Participants will see how existing schools can be transformed into learning environments that align with today’s educational goals. You will tour flexible classrooms and small group spaces that encourage communication and peer-to-peer learning. You’ll see the innovative learning corridor that opens the LRC to the school community. The classrooms encourage active learning with easy-to-rearrange, flexible furniture. Students collaborate in small (breakout rooms), research in an introspective space (window seat), or engage as a large group. Color defines the cohorts and special areas within the school (e.g., third-grade spaces are teal; pre-K blue; reading rooms green). Transparent walls enhance security and inspire wonder by putting learning on display. They function as writing surfaces in spaces such as the breakout rooms and excite students with their novelty. Students and staff connect to the world of living things through natural light, views, and the selection of materials (e.g., “grass” Flotex flooring and wood-look ceilings). This is especially evident in the presentation space, where an amphitheater becomes a “hill.” The “learning corridor” is a mash-up of circulation and media center that welcomes students to linger with a book or technology.

 

Jane L. Westerhold Early Learning Center

Abstract:   Following passage of an education rate referendum and prudent fiscal management over an eight year span, Des Plaines CCSD 62 built its fund balances to make substantial building improvements throughout the District. Following an extensive two-year building assessment, master planning, and community engagement process the Board of Education approved the issuance of non-referendum bonds totaling $109 million for a three-phase capital improvement program. In addition to supporting educational program enhancements, the capital improvement funding was assigned to update, enhance, and expand educational environments throughout the District. In combination with major additions/renovation projects at three of its most aged and overcrowded facilities, the District elected to maximize its resources and consolidate under one roof, alongside the most centrally located elementary school, all of its early childhood education programs that had been scattered throughout the District.

The primary instructional spaces in the schools are positioned around two, secured courtyards. In both cases, a combination of fixed/operable windows and stackable glass doors allow an abundance of natural light to permeate from these outdoor instructional venues into the core of the building. The first courtyard is formed by constructing the ELC addition along the east side of the elementary school. It is intended to accommodate shared-use, garden plots. The second courtyard is the organizing feature of the ELC.

 

 

CCSD 59 Early Learning Center

Abstract:   The CCSD59 Early Learning Center was designed to inspire curiosity, encourage interaction, and optimize indoor/outdoor connections. The facility, driven by community workshops, offers a setting customized to early learners: colorful curving patterns, tactile materials, and places to gather and explore. The entry even has a child-sizeblue door that welcomes students.Tour highlights include a large, nature-based motor courtyard and three themed learning gardens that create secure play areas and maximize natural light and views. Other features include integrated therapy rooms between classrooms, light-filled corridors with a culinary arts space and break.out areas, an indoor motor skills area, and a family support center. This facility was constructed as an addition to the existing Holmes Junior High School. It was constructed to consolidate the district’s early learner population in one centralized location. This consolidation freed up space at other district schools to allow for the implementation of full-day kindergarten district-wide. The 58,000-square-foot addition provides a secure connection point to the Junior High School to allow program access between facilities. It also houses dual-use training space for district staff and parents.

Explore how outdoor sensory areas incorporate nature-inspired elements and impact the curriculum.

 

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Observe design strategies adopted to enhance cooperation and trust among the occupants.
  2. Observe design strategies that support a student-focused curriculum
  3. Explore how outdoor sensory areas incorporate nature-inspired elements and impact the curriculum.
  4. Evaluate how facility layout and design elements promote natural light and outdoor views.

TOUR IS FULL

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***Please note: for security measures photos of students are not allowed during the tour. ***